Emolleia Flowers

  • Tuesday, Aug 31, 2021
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Emolleia Flowers project is to explore and design novel non-verbal interaction tools. We explore how to create expressive clothes and accessories that are able to instantaneously reflect our feelings. We design a wearable kinetic display in form of three 3D printed flowers that can dynamically open and close at different speeds. Users can define their own animated motions. The kinetic display is the result of several design iterations trying to capture the movements of flower ensembles. We want to explore whether this type of wearable accessory could be a novel form of non-verbal communication.

Prototype Design

The device was constructed by three main parts, flowers, servo motors case and a steel chain to fix the device on the body. The 3d printing flowers are fixed at the stem and consist of five petals with a diameter of 6 [cm]. We chose Elastic 50A resin as flower’s material since the softness allows the prototype to bend over and reform motion freely, the special transparency of this material also matched our designed sketch.

User Study

To explore potential use cases, self-expression possibilities and the general perception of the prototype, we conducted a series of online survey. After watching eight animated motions, participants rated the arousal and valence for each. Based on the mapping to the emotion model, we picked three obviously distinguishable animated motions for our next stage user studies.

[1] Yifan Zhuang, Keitaro Tsuchiya, Takuro Nakao, Jiawen Han, Megumi Isoga, Shinya Shimizu, and Kai Kunze. 2022. Emolleia – Wearable Kinetic Flower Display for Expressing Emotions. In Sixteenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI ’22), February 13–16, 2022

Contributors

Project Lead: Yifan Zhuang

Technical Engineering: Keitaro Tsuchiya, Takuro Nakao
Data Analysis: Jiawen Han
Research Supervisor: Megumi Isoga, Shinya Shimizu, and Kai Kunze

Collaboration

Emolleia Flowers project is in collaboration with NTT Media Intelligence Laboratories